Online food retail has exploded in response to COVID-19. This shift to online represents a huge opportunity to transform sales and logistics so that agroecological farming can regenerate our world. In this article I explore technical infrastructure that can support a diverse and vibrant ecosystem of solutions to transform food and farming.

Online has long been a place for agroecological produce to find alternate routes to market. From box schemes to food hubs to community food enterprises, groups have aimed to reduce their overheads through an online sales presence. These groups have carved a cosy niche though overall food retail…


Take a moment, if you will, and imagine the healthiest landscape that you possibly can. What does it look like? Are there trees? Is it teaming with life? A garden of Eden? I’m going to hazard a guess that you were able to do this without too much difficulty. Perhaps you were inspired by your own experiences, perhaps snippets of imagery belonging to a David Attenborough documentary. Regardless of how you came to be able to visualise this, the sights, sounds and sensory experiences of a healthy environment exist within you. Within us all. We all know what a healthy…


High quality food is often seen as a luxury product. Fresh fruit and vegetables are expensive to those feeding families on low incomes. Food that is grown without fertilisers and pesticides or that is produced to high animal welfare standards can be seen as unaffordable. Fresh, home cooked food with high production standards is known to be more nutritious, more ecologically regenerative and more socially just. It is better for people and the planet. So how do we find ourselves in a place in which so many people have no choice but to eat low quality food?

A Brief History…


Am I co-creating exactly the problems that I wish to mend?

Having been an environmental activist for most of my adult life I find myself carrying some pretty bleak images in my head. The overarching narrative is one of unstoppable planetary destruction. In my mind I carry around an idealised version of the natural world; abundant and overflowing with life. When I walk around my current habitat, the streets and wetlands of east London, the world does not live up to my expectations. I observe it as a wasteland. A baron, undernourished, human-centric dump verging on a cesspit.

I sit…


Our culture seems to be obsessed with short-termism. Somehow we’ve found ourselves filling every moment, taking pride in how much we can maximise an instant and focusing our attention on how to maximise the next. If we want to understand how to take a long-term view in food and farming then it might be worth understanding how we wound up here, and what inspiration we might draw from other ways of viewing time.

We find ourselves in a world in which every few seconds an email lands in our inbox. Between all the apps and methods of contact I seem…


Over December and January the Open Food Network UK team have been exploring a team review process in line with our values. In this post I describe the process we trialled and offer some reflections and learnings from the experience.

We aim to structure our team and work in a non-hierarchical way. Of course, this is impossible for many reasons. Some people have been in the team longer and have more knowledge and experience. Some people have more responsibility with funders and in partnerships. Some people work more days per week. Some have kids and schools are closed. Some have…


Last night I went for a walk at about 11pm. Walking in the dark I noticed a wild, four legged friend playing with me. It ran circles around me a few times, sat, looked, sat up, ran a circle closer to me. I joined in playing. I sat, looked, sat up, spoke to it, walked a little more. We got closer and closer. The mutual play was real, it surprised us both. For a moment it was beautiful.

Until the image of the wolf entered my head.

The wolf is a symbol of instinct, intuition and wildness, but also a…


It might not have been as bad as some predicted, but COVID-19 certainly showed us that our food systems are vulnerable in times of crisis. In this blog Lynne Davis explores the lessons we can learn from the pandemic shock to build resilient future food systems.

The stories of empty supermarket shelves and dairy farmers pouring milk down the drain sent a reverberation of fear through most of us, evoking images of collapse similar to those we’d heard about from the Great Depression. There was a call for food rationing. At home many started stockpiling. The government created a cartel


Activists from around the country come together to rebel, protest and importantly, grieve

Kübler-Ross famously described grief as a process of five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. As a society, we are grieving a dying planet and slowly but surely going through the five stages of this process.

First comes denial. People have been talking about ecological collapse at least since Rachel Carson’s ‘Silent Spring’ but for the most part our society ignored the concerns. Over the following decades activists began to take a stand. Activism at this time was fuelled by anger, with activists gaining a reputation for damage and destruction in the act of blocking activities deemed destructive to…

Lynne Davis

Exploring the interplay between food, economic, technological & social systems. While earth systems let us.

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